Vintage Easter Desserts (1933) | Easter Egg Shells

Easter Egg Treats.

When the Easter bunny comes this year perhaps he’ll delight the children with some Easter styles from the kitchen. In the first place, save every egg shell you use in cooking. Carefully crack and make an opening and then rinse and dry the sehll. These shells can be used for many purposes such as molds for desserts, containers for candy and small gifts or quaintly styled Easter eggs.

One of the most fascinating fashions in Easter eggs is that of filling an empty shell with tiny candy eggs or jelly beans. After rinsing and drying, the shell is carefully dipped into dye, taking care that no dye gets inside the shell. After thoroughly drying they are filled with the candy. The uncolored end with the hole is covered with gay paper of a contrasting color, pasted firmly over the hole to keep the candies in. The ends of the paper are fringed and twisted.

A most attractive Easter dessert is made by filling the empty egg shells with different colored gelatins, Liquid gelatin, colored and flavored as you please, is poured through the opening in the small end of the egg. A small paper funnel made of stiff parchment paper is an aid in pouring the gelatin into the shell. Let the gelatin stand in the molds at least eight hours to become firm and thoroughly chilled.

When ready to serve, dip each egg into hot water. This melts the gelatin on the shell. Then crack the shell in may places and remove it just as you would from a hard cooked egg. Pile the eggs on a chilled serving dish and serve with whipped cream.

Source: The Milwaukee Journal, 1933

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Easter Plum Pudding (1877)

Recipe for Hot-Cross Buns (1887)

Maple-wax Easter Eggs – A Victorian Era Treat

Saffron Cake For Easter (1875)

Ancient Easter Dishes – Tansy

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